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Lavender Labia
Lavender Labia
redcaptainnickel:

Look everyone it is a small banana.
Isn’t that strange and wonderful.

redcaptainnickel:

Look everyone it is a small banana.

Isn’t that strange and wonderful.

[TW: discussion of rape] Native women who are survivors of violence often find themselves forced into silence around sexual and domestic violence by their communities because their communities desire to maintain a united front against racism and colonialism. At the same time, the white-dominated antiviolence movement often pits Native women against their communities, arguing that they should leave the communities in which their abusers reside. The reason Native women are constantly marginalized in male-dominated discourses about racism and colonialism and white-dominated discourses about sexism is the inability of both discourses to address the inextricable relationship between gender violence and colonialism. That is, the issue is not simply that violence against women happens during colonization, but that the colonial process is itself structured by sexual violence. Native nations cannot decolonize themselves until they address gender violence, because colonization has succeeded through this kind of violence. In part, this is because the history of colonization of Native people is interrelated with colonizers’ assaults upon Indian bodies. It is through the constant assaults upon our bodies that colonizers have attempted to eradicate our sense of Indian identity. Consequently, violence against Native women is inextricably linked to the state. As Andrea Smith has argued elsewhere (Smith, 1999), Indian bodies have become marked as inherently “dirty” through the colonial process. They are then considered sexually violable and “rapeable,” and by extension, Native lands become marked as inherently invadeable. That is, in patriarchal thinking, only a body that is “pure” can be violated. The rape of bodies that are considered inherently impure or dirty does not count. For instance, prostitutes have an almost impossible time being believed if they are raped because the dominant society considers the prostitute’s body to be undeserving of integrity and violable at all times. Similarly, the history of mutilation of Indian bodies, both living and dead, makes it clear to Indian people that they are not entitled to bodily integrity (Ibid.).

In the history of massacres against Indian people, colonizers attempt not only to defeat Indian people, but also to eradicate their very identity and humanity. They attempt to transform Indian people from human beings into tobacco pouches, bridle reins, or souvenirs — an object for the consumption of white people. However, as Haunani Kay Trask’s essay in this issue demonstrates, this colonized violence continues to manifests itself today in a variety of forms. Trask articulates the relationship between colonization and violence as “a quiet violence.” That is, the violence of colonization is evidenced not merely in the most obvious forms of the history of massacres against indigenous peoples in the Americas, but in the continuing institutionalized forms of racism, discrimination, and housing that manifest themselves on a daily basis in the lives of Native peoples. Through this colonization and abuse of their bodies, Indian people learn to internalize self-hatred. Body image is integrally related to self-esteem. When one’s body is not respected, one begins to hate oneself. Thus, it is not a surprise that Indian people who have survived sexual abuse say they do not want to be Indian (Smith, 1999).

[…]

It is clear that the struggle for sovereignty and the struggle against sexual violence cannot be separated. Thus, conceptualizing sexual violence as a tool of genocide and colonialism fundamentally alters the strategies for combating it. Since the first domestic violence shelter in the U.S. opened in 1974 and the first rape crisis center opened in 1972, the mainstream antiviolence movement has been critical to breaking the silence concerning violence against women and providing critically needed services to survivors of sexual/domestic violence.

The antiviolence movement first prioritized a response to male violence based on grass-roots political mobilization. However, as the antiviolence movement has gained greater public prominence, domestic violence and rape crisis centers have also become increasingly professionalized, and consequently are often reluctant to address sexual and domestic violence within the larger context of institutionalized violence. As a case in point, many state coalitions on domestic/sexual violence have refused to take stands against the anti-immigration backlash, arguing that this issue is not a sexual/domestic violence issue. However, as the immigration backlash intensifies, many immigrant women do not report abuse for fear of deportation. This narrow approach toward working against violence is problematic because it is impossible to seriously address sexual/domestic violence within communities of color without addressing the larger structures of violence, such as militarism, attacks on immigrants’ rights and Indian treaty rights, the proliferation of prisons, economic neocolonialism, and institutional racism.

Andrea Smith and Luana Ross, Native Women and State Violence

my-username-was-taken:

lavenderlabia:

lavenderlabia:

my-username-was-taken:

lavenderlabia:

my-username-was-taken:

Re:this.

I completely agree.

I cannot wait until people start realising that Peta represents all vegans like Mitt Romney represents all of America.

Mitt Romney represents a significant portion of America. And no one said PETA represented all vegans…might be a good idea to avoid the sentiment I was mocking in my original post…

Mitt Romney represents half of America. He therefore also doesn’t represent a significant portion of America.

Mitt Romney represents a significant portion of America. And no one said PETA represented all vegans…might be a good idea to avoid the sentiment I was mocking in my original post…

Half is a significant proportion. It isn’t a majority but it IS significant. You can’t just write off half an entire population…

Well you can’t use language in a way that suggests all of the population is like a ‘significant proportion’ of the population either. 

I never did. You seem to have interpreted my language in a way outside its meaning…

jadelyn:

femshepard:

[Re: this.]

Where the fuck do I even begin to start…??

I’d probably do something to the effect of:

Equality is fantastic, IF everyone is starting out on a level playing field. The problem is, we’re not. Our history builds our present. We can’t just pretend like hundreds of years of oppression didn’t happen just because you want to hold hands and skip off into the sunset together. The point of affirmative action policies isn’t a “quota” sort of thing, and it’s not arbitrary “because we should”. It’s because people of color are still dealing with the effects of that whole hundreds of years of slavery/oppression/genocide/etc depending on which ethnic group you’re talking about, and that means that overall, people of color are struggling with obstacles that white people don’t have to, which can affect how much education they get, what kind of work experience they have, etc. So affirmative action tries to level the playing field a little bit to break the “white men hiring white men” cycle. Same goes for test scores. If you want to end affirmative action, work on ending the structural inequalities that make it necessary, and then it can go away with its purpose fulfilled.

Part of the problem here is a fundamental misunderstanding of what we mean when we say “privilege”. It’s not something where people say “I get more privileges” and then they get them.  It’s a structural problem that subtly (or not-so-subtly) places obstacles in the paths of PoC, and removes them from the paths of white people. White people don’t have to ask to be given privileges. We’re surrounded by them from the day we’re born - literally. Look up studies on maternal outcomes by race sometime. It’s an eye-opener.  And from that day forth, we live in a world that always cuts us a little bit of slack on things, lets us get away with more shit, gives us the benefit of the doubt instead of presuming guilt. We don’t have to say “We get these privileges” - we’re swimming in them so deeply that most of the time we can’t even see it.

And the notion that Jewish people who survived the Holocaust or were descended from them “didn’t use that as an excuse to get extra privileges” … I’m sorry, what the hell do you think Israel IS? They got a WHOLE COUNTRY complete with running out the previous inhabitants of the land they were given. If that’s not special privileges I don’t know what is. But it still doesn’t fall under the actual definition of “privilege” in the way Amanda was using it.

And then drop links on them. Peggy McIntosh’s Invisible Knapsack (the seminal privilege list). Privilege 101Racism 101. The myth of reverse-racism (unfortunately, this one is Tim Wise; it’s the link I have saved from a long time ago, but if anyone else has something similar written by an PoC, please let me know). On “colorblindness” as a form of racism. The Angry Eye, 1 and 2. Statistics.  

Go forth and do battle!

Reblogging because this is an excellent summary that I know will come in handy one day.

pomme-poire-peche:

imperius-rex:

JESUS FUCKING CHRIST WHY DID I NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS CAT BEFORE.
HER NAME IS TAMA.AND SHE’S THE STATIONMASTER AT A TRAIN STATION IN JAPAN.SHE GREETS ALL THE PASSENGERS.AND SHE HAS HER OWN OFFICE.AND SHE’S PAID IN CAT FOOD.AND SHE IS A FUCKING EXECUTIVE OF A FUCKING RAILROAD STATION.
AND LOOK AT HER:


YOU GUYS.THEY TORE DOWN THE STATION.AND REBUILT IT.TO LOOK LIKE A CAT.WITH HER NAME ON TOP.


Learn more about Tama here. 

pomme-poire-peche:

imperius-rex:

JESUS FUCKING CHRIST WHY DID I NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS CAT BEFORE.

HER NAME IS TAMA.
AND SHE’S THE STATIONMASTER AT A TRAIN STATION IN JAPAN.
SHE GREETS ALL THE PASSENGERS.
AND SHE HAS HER OWN OFFICE.
AND SHE’S PAID IN CAT FOOD.
AND SHE IS A FUCKING EXECUTIVE OF A FUCKING RAILROAD STATION.

AND LOOK AT HER:

YOU GUYS.
THEY TORE DOWN THE STATION.
AND REBUILT IT.
TO LOOK LIKE A CAT.
WITH HER NAME ON TOP.

Learn more about Tama here

An Incomplete List of Noteable People I’ve Delivered Pizzas To

tybaar:

It’s coming up on a year now since I got my current job as a pizza delivery girl, and I thought this would be a good time to delve into the little ever-expanding “WTFPIZZA” note I keep on my cell that helps me remember some of my more, uh - interesting deliveries.

So without further ado and in no particular order, here’s some pizza customers who left a lasting impression on me thus far:

- A bearded man who answered the door and periodically spat blood into a crusted Harley-Davidson coffee mug while counting out his cash.

- A woman who slipped me a business card (in lieu of tip) for a laser tattoo removal clinic, explaining “In case you want to bring your mutilated skin back to how God intended it to be.”

- At least three Batmans so far, but only one who did the voice.

- An elderly Spanish woman who meekly presented me with a (rather classy) pearl-handled .32 snub nosed revolver and asked if I knew how to load it (I do) and also, if I could load it for her (I didn’t).

- A group of EMT’s hanging out in the back of an ambulance at a recently extinguished (but still smouldering) house fire.

- A man with a thick Alabama accent who admonished me for standing in front of his mailbox while I waited for him to answer the door.  He then explained how this was a federal offense because I was “obstructing the mail system” and demanded my social security number so he could “report me to the proper authorities”.

- A group of young teenage girls (like 14-16) who begged me to buy a case of Bud Light (ew why) and bring it back to them.

- A hotel room full of badass middle-aged women all dressed as Professor McGonagall from the Harry Potter films, who were also completely wasted on Jello shots. They kept encouraging me to stay and party with them.

- A 20-something dude who answered the door with an unsheathed katana dangling through a belt loop on his jeans.

- Multiple instances of people asking if I would sell them pot. (bitch get your own dealer sheesh)

- A guy who slipped a twenty directly into my shirt because I apparently was the “spitting image” of his deceased daughter.

- A woman who admonished me for driving a Mazda, and wrote “get a real car” in the tip portion of my credit receipt.

- A very drunk dude who gave me his iPhone and had me take a bunch of Myspace-esque pictures of the both of us.  He did the duck lips thing in every shot.

- Multiple prank deliveries (joke’s on you motherfucker, I get paid for the gas AND I eat the pizzas you ordered).

- An elderly man who wrote “FUCK OFF” as his signature on a credit receipt.

- A thirty-something guy who begged to get his order for free because he “works so hard”. He visibly teared up and sniffled when I told him I couldn’t do anything.

- A dudebro wearing a bath robe and socks + sandals (indoors) who straight up wordlessly yanked the pizzas out of my hands without paying and shut the door.  Multiple knockings were of no avail.

- A woman who angrily demanded to see my ID because she refused to believe my claims that I’m female. She proceeded to snatch my driver’s license out of my hand, run back into her house and show it to her children while pointing back at me.

- A kid no older than 14 who desperately tried to convince me to play WoW on the free custom server he was playing on. (But it has double XP!)

- A guy who spent the entire time I was there digging a (impressively large) booger out of his nose. He proceeded to smear it on, thankfully, HIS copy of the receipt.

- An on-duty cop who flagged me down by intercepting me on the road before I got to the police station and pulling me over to get his pizza.

- A drill instructor looking-guy who filled out his entire credit card receipt, specifically wrote “0.00” in the tip portion, then proceeded to write out a check for seventy-eight cents and handed it to me. It said “pizza tip” in the “For” section.

- A furious lady who yelled at me for a solid five minutes (I kept track) all about how long it took for her delivery to get to her. She then tipped me an extra ten bucks on a six dollar order. I dunno.

- An incredibly stoned teenager trying and failing to look sober. When I complimented his Adventure Time wallet (which was super cute) and asked where he got it, he immediately looked terrified, sat down on the floor and muttered “I… I don’t know….”

- Obligatory naked man with unimpressive penis.

- A chick at a house party who answered the door and immediately turned to vomit into her mailbox.

- A surly Korean mom with an amazing shoulder tattoo of a baby giving birth to a full-grown woman.

- A man who lived in one of those mini-mansions inside a gated community, who sported a seemingly massive collection of what appeared to be solid glass spheres of varying size and color. I only got a quick glance in his house but there had to be hundreds of them in display racks, tables, shelves - everywhere.

- A group of 20-something guys who challenged me to sing the original Pokemon theme song, which I did. And perfectly, I may add.

- A completely iced-out musclebound gangster kid who was blaring Regina Spektor so loud and with so much bass I actually couldn’t hear anything he was saying.

- An elderly guy who deadpan asked me if I knew anyone who could score him hollowpoint bullets.

- An adorable older lesbian couple who were mortified that they didn’t have any extra money for a tip, so they gave me a big sack of pistachios instead. It took me three weeks to finish the bag.

missatralissa:

Hey, I recognize that view. 

missatralissa:

Hey, I recognize that view. 

Won’t somebody please think of the vegans? This isn’t fair. They aren’t all like that. 

If a black woman and a white woman both need emergency obstetric care, a Brazilian doctor will assist the white woman because of the stereotype that black women are better at handling pain and are used to giving birth.

Racism Is Bad for Health

Read the rest of the study at the link, with details on how this racism in healthcare plays out.

(via redlightpolitics)

yessilikes:

Re: this.

Ughh shut up, people will use any reason to try to discredit veganism, which is mentioned exactly ZERO times in the article, as if 1) all vegans eat quinoa (I fucking don’t), 2) non vegans don’t eat it (hello, my friends eat it all the time and they always mention how they “can’t live” without cheese or whatever other bullshit reason they come up with), 3) all fucking vegans are white (just shut the fuck up, as the article helps make clear, MANY indigenous diets favor vegetarianism or veganism because, hello, meat is difficult to produce).

And the problems Bolivia is facing are a result of the larger problem of lack of resources made available to the most marginalized members of their society, the same problem we see worldwide. Bolivia has the same problem with coca, which is also a crop considered a gift from the gods to help them survive the harsh environment, by suppressing hungry and increasing stamina. Many farmers have decided to grow coca, the crop from which cocaine is extracted, because it is simply more profitable, with similar results to the ones mentioned in the article, compounded by the legality issues.

We need to have a larger discussion about how we are allocating resources globally. I don’t understand people’s fucking need to try to discredit veganism, when we are trying our best to lead less harmful lives. Are we fucking perfect? Like, fucking no, we still eat produce grow by workers surviving under horrible conditions, like everyone else, but we are doing the best we can. Many of us also try to decrease our impact through other avenues, like the rest of our food choices or our clothing.

I just don’t understand people who think it is better to do nothing than to do something.

Veganism doesn’t need to be mentioned in the article. The point is: veganism is largely responsible for the fashionable status that quinoa currently enjoys in Western countries. It’s considered a “super-food” and thus appeals to a lot of those with alternative diets (of which vegans make up a considerable proportion). The article is discussing how this rising popularity has negatively impacted on indigenous populations. Instead of listening and understanding you start yelling about “not all vegans are like that”. No one said they were. 

You also seem to be misinterpreting a few other things. No one said all vegans eat quinoa. No one said non-vegans don’t eat it. No one said that vegans are all white. Based on these assumptions you have gone off on a defensive rant…and that says more about where you’re coming from than it does about how vegans are being unfairly criticised or whatever. 

And you are very wrong to say it’s better to do something than nothing. Nothing is often a very good thing to do. Particularly when that “something” gives you a misplaced sense of self-righteousness. Particularly when that “something” doesn’t actually reduce harm but merely shifts it from animals to people. And particularly when that “something” hasn’t been considered or critiqued thoroughly.

To summarise: the need to discredit veganism arises because, by and large, vegans are self-righteous douchecanoes who preach about cruelty-free living but actually cause a fuck-load of harm. Not to mention the other problems with veganism that fall outside the scope of this discussion. If you still need more reasons why people hate vegans, read this.

[Footnote: Yes, many indigenous diets are vegan or vegetarian based, but that doesn’t mean those people are vegans in the sense you are a vegan. Veganism as it usually manifests is not merely a diet. It is a dogma, a way of life, a way of privilege and choice. And broadly speaking indigenous living is about sustainability and survival - things that often require meat consumption. In other words: vegetarianism/veganism is only associated with indigenous diets and is rarely the driving force behind them.]